recipes "Classic Risotto Recipes"


Modern twists on time-honoured favourites.


WILD GARLIC, LEMON & RICOTTA RISOTTO


What do you need

  • [   ] 300 g of Riso Gallo Carnaroli Sustainable
  • [   ] 90 g of grated Grana Padano cheese
  • [   ] 100 g of onion (finely chopped)
  • [   ] 40 g of unsalted butter
  • [   ] 1 litre of vegetable or chicken stock
  • [   ] 100 ml of dry white wine
  • [   ] 250 g of wild garlic
  • [   ] 2 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil
  • [   ] 100 g of fresh ricotta cheese
  • [   ] 1 lemon
  • [   ] Salt and pepper (to taste)

Proposed by: Danilo Cortellini


60'
4
Easy

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How to prepare:

Start with the wild garlic puree. Rinse and pat dry the wild garlic, discard only the very large and bulky stalks to use in the stock perhaps and the flowers as garnish if you wish. Everything else can be used. Once dry quickly blanch in salted boiling water the garlic until soft. This will take no longer than 1 minute. Now blitz the garlic in a food processor adding a bit of the cooking water if necessary. You are looking for a puree/paste consistency so be careful with the liquid and don’t stress to much if the paste is grainy, that is the beauty of a rustic recipe.
 
For the risotto gently fry the chopped onion in a small pan with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of salt for about 10-15 minutes on low heat, until well golden and caramelized. Keep to one side.
 
In a large casserole, start to toast the rice on a low heat with a pinch of salt, without adding oil or fat. In this way, the heat reaches the core of each rice grain resulting in more uniform al dente rice. Keep stirring the rice, so the rice does not catch on the bottom of the pan or burn. When the rice is very hot, pour the white wine in. Let the alcohol evaporate, set the cooking time to 15 minutes and add the simmering stock a ladle at a time, little by little. Stir the rice occasionally, and keep cooking.
 
Halfway through the cooking, add the caramelized onion to the rice and wild garlic puree and keep stirring. At this stage you want to check if the ricotta is too watery as it could mess with the texture of the risotto. Get rid of the water by draining it with a coriander.
Once the cooking time of the risotto is up, if you’re happy with the texture remove it from the heat.
 
The last step is called “mantecatura” – with the right movements you can make the risotto creamier and increase its natural ooziness. Add the grated Grana Padano cheese and butter to the rice and stir with energy to incorporate extra air until the risotto is nice and creamy. Season to taste and add a splash of lemon juice.
 
Plate the hot risotto and top with lemon zest, with chunks of fresh ricotta on optional a few basil leaves.


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